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RT1 Rotary Thread File Small

$16.99

In stock

  • Ideal for restoring Inch, Metric, Pipe, Male, and Female Threads
  • Can restore Metals, Hardened Metals, Ceramics, Glass, and Plastics
  • Easy to restore deep internal threads
  • Made with strong and durable materials
  • Engineered and Patented in the USA
  • For bulk orders, please contact us
  • Product Sheet Specification
SKU: RT1-LP02 Category:

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Restore dent, dinged, or damaged threads in nuts and bolts within a minute with the RT1 Rotary Thread File! Restoring threads on the smallest bolts and getting into deep nuts without worrying about getting the right pitch is exactly what you’ll get with the RT1.

Ideal for restoring Inch, Metric, Pipe, Male, and Female Threads made out of Metals, Hardened Metals, Ceramics, Glass, and Plastics, the RT1 has become the go-to thread repair tool for both home improvement enthusiasts as well as industry professionals.

What is the RT1 Rotary Thread File Used For?

Damaged threads usually lead to unsecured pieces of machinery that can cause further machine damage or worse, hazardous accidents. Before, plenty of people used to work with Taps and Dies and found it difficult and time-consuming to restore threads on their own, so they end up getting expensive replacement parts or hiring a professional to do repairs.
With the RT1 Rotary Thread at your disposal, you no longer need to worry about costly repairs and replacement parts. You can save hundreds of dollars in repairs and have your damaged threads fixed in under a minute with the RT1’s universal threading design.

The Rotary Thread file is the only tool you can use for restoring loose inner and outer threads. Unlike taps and dies that you need to switch up depending on what part you are trying to restore, you can use one RT1 Rotary Thread file to restore either a nut or bolt.

The RT1 was designed by industry professionals for in-home projects, automotive, farm & ranch, and industrial use. Whether you’re a beginner or a professional, all it takes is a few seconds to restore threads back to their perfect condition.

All you need to do is attach the RT1 to your die grinder, secure the threaded part you want to restore, start along the good threads, and slowly make your way towards the damaged thread. No experience is needed!

Fix Any Threaded Tool or Material!

The RT1 Rotary File Thread can help you quickly restore threads made out of materials including Metals, Hardened Metals, Ceramics, Glass, and Plastics.

Its ingenious universal design is what makes it possible to cut hours of threading work into mere seconds. Unlike traditional thread repair tools that come in standard sizes, the RT1 is an all-in-one tool that eliminates the need for switching when you’re working with both external and internal threads.

The small ⅜-inch diameter of its head makes it quick and easy to restore even the deepest damaged threads in nuts. No more worrying about pitches and diameters, the universal 60-degree “V” angle ensures you will get the right pitch every time whether you’re working on Inch, Metric, Pipe threads.

Quick Storage & Easy Maintenance

The RT1 is made with highly durable materials that can last you years of regular use. Its small size makes it ultimately easy to store in any toolbox in your home or shop.

You can also prolong its lifespan and get the best performance every time by using tapping oil when restoring threads. It is also recommended to add light pressure to the tool when you’re working on threads to reduce the pressure on the tool.

To get the best performance during every use, we recommend you clean the tool with non-flammable paint thinner after restoring threads.

Available Replacement Parts

Lost your Rotary Thread file? Don’t fret, our Rotary Thread files are super affordable and can easily be ordered online! We offer files, grooves, glands, mandrels, and collets by the piece on our website.

Additional information

Weight 0.5 lbs
Dimensions 7.63 × 3.69 × 0.5 in
Average Rating

4.52

96
( 96 Reviews )
5 Star
73.96%
4 Star
13.54%
3 Star
7.29%
2 Star
1.04%
1 Star
4.17%

Only logged in customers who have purchased this product may leave a review.

96 Reviews For This Product

  1. 96

    by Jake

    I’m a mechanic. Damaged threads are just part of the job sometimes. The case that brought me in contact with this tool was a spindle on the rear end of a Dana 80 truck axle. It would have required a $200 3″ threading die. I decided to try this tool. I took something that looked beyond repair and transformed it to the point where the large lock nut spun on by hand.It takes some skill. It’s not a toilet plunger. You need to have a steady hand and a good Dremel tool but the payoff is quite impressive. It’s a tool anyone who works on anything threaded should have. It saved my butt and a buttload of money as well.

  2. 96

    by OLarryR

    I removed the grab rails off my sailboat to remove layers of varnish and then apply teak oil before re-installing. The nature of these grab rails are that they have 7 stud bolts on each of the two rails and they firmly attach the rails to the top of the cabin – The studs pass thru drilled holes in the Fiberglas and then washer, lock washer and nut hold the rails firmly on top of the cabin. The bolt head end of the stud is not visible – It is inside the top of the rail and wood plugs contoured to the top of the rail hide the bolt heads. These studs should never have to be removed from inside the rail and to do is a chore since the plug would have to be drilled out and a new one installed and contouredmto the rail. Initially, when I removed the nuts from the studs inside the cabin, one of the nuts was had to unthread from the stud and the stud started to rotate within the rail. So, I had to use pliers to hold the stud tight and another set of pliers to unthread the nut. When it was time to re-install the nut, I could not thread it onto the stud. My pliers had ruined the lower threads.I was considering using a diamond cutoff wheel on my Drexel to remove the lower threads but that would leave few threads available to re-install the nut and besides The nut was had to unthread it initially, so I would still be face with that problem as well.I then discovered the EZThread 382 searching the web and Amazon for solutions either by buying a different type of fastener to clamp to the existing threads but then I came across this tool to repair existing threads.The 382 mini-grinder tool was easy to use. It just about 1-2 minutes of use, I was able to get the nut back on. But other threads made it hard to completely re-install the washers and nut, so I tweaked addl threads and kept testing how easy it was to completely install the nut. After only another few minutes of tweaking the threads, the nut washers and nut were able to be re-installed easily. Since I was now able to rethread the nut all the way up to the inside cabin top, the friction fit at the bolt head kept the stud from rotating within the rail and I was able to torque the nut fine. So, this tool not only repaired the initial threads to get the nut on but tweaking the rest of the threads enabled me to utilize the stud, get a tight fit, without having to replace the stud which would have been a much longer repair and would have required labor to replace and contour a new plug on the outside of the rail.This is a great tool ! I am telling all my friends about it !

  3. 96

    by William Edwards

    It’s very rare these days that things actually work, and this thing worked. Saved me $985!. We have a firetruck and one of the hose reels threads had corroded to the point of no return. The replacement cost was extremely expensive as the thread is attached to one piece and can not be replaced. I gave this thing a try as a hail-mary and it actually worked. Half of the threads were on the backside that I couldn’t see so I just followed the front threads and prayed that i wouldn’t jump over a thread. Followed it all the way back around and kept going. Used a little Brakleen to clean off the grit and the coupler fit right on first time around. I still cant believe it.

  4. 96

    by T. R. Stedman

    Concept of tool really good when used in good hands however the shank of tool is too short, it would only reach part way into threaded bore in my case and chuck of rotating tool got in the way. It will be a usefull addition to my rethreading repertoire but next job not this one.

  5. 96

    by Bullseye

    Worked great to restore threads I buggered up in a water filtration tank . 2 1/4 straight Pipe Thread… used dremel and a small cordless drill. Both worked well. Used Boeing drill Lube because completely non toxic.. get right RPM , start in good tread and keep moving around over damaged area in a smooth and even motion.. You can feel the damaged spots.. don’t try to sit in one spot to remove damage… keep trying fit so as not to remove to much material..

  6. 96

    by Think7

    Although I was shocked by how small it is – it saved a damaged 3/4″ threaded rod I had already welded to a bracket. I used a Dremel and magnification and was able within a few minutes to get the nut to travel the full length of the rod. ONE LIMITATION is this works best where you can get the tool perpendicular to the threads being repaired. Even using a Dremel extension I had to work at a slight angle 6″ from the end of the rod which wasn’t a problem due to the large threads I was fixing but it could be an issue on finer threads.

  7. 96

    by L. Forman

    I purchased the smallest rethreader at 3/8″ diameter to help a neighbor friend who had badly cross threaded a unicycle set of pedals. The threads were about 13 mm and both right hand and left hand threads, so it would be too expensive to purchase both taps for the cranks. My neighbor replaced the cross threaded pedals so I “only” needed to clear the female threads. I used tap oil and the small tool in a dremel tool. I held the Unicycle wheel in my bench vice to keep the cranks stable. I used two fingers on the cranks for fine movement of the tool tip and my other hand held the back of the Dremel to keep it in proper alignment with the axis of the shaft. At first I was only able to hand thread about 1/4 of a revolution. I started working near the inlet of the threads with the tool. I was able to slowly get my hand to thread a few threads of the pedal shaft into the crank. I then started working from those good threads deeper into the crank. I would remove the pedal, clean the threads of debris, and see how far I was able to hand thread the pedal into the crank. I was able to keep moving it a few revolutions each time. Reoiled each time til I was about 4 revolutions from totally threading the pedal into the crank. I then gently used a wrench and worked the shaft gently around and back and forth as it rolled more threads clearing them. Not forcing the wrench too much was key as well as working back and forth gently threading the pedal into the crank until it was totally in. I removed the pelal and used medium blue thread locker and that side was done. The other side with left hand threads on the left pedal was worse and I could only hand thread about 1/8 of a revolution by hand. Started working again from the thread inlet gently clearing threads and hand threading the pedal into the crank making darn sure it was straight and true. This time, after clearing about half of the length I started using the wrench to help roll the right threads. Working back and forth and slowly and gently moving the shaft into the threads. Never forcing excessively. It went faster this way and I needed to remove less material with the tool this way. This tool is awesome on female threads that are buggered up. Needs a steady hand and work slowly removing as little material as possible and constantly testing how it is going. WIth a deeply cross threaded hole, this was the acid test of the tool and it passed with flying colors. Well worth the price and much less than replacing the cranks or purchasing two expensive taps. This tool is a keeper as I work on classic cars for a hobby and buggered up threads are common.

  8. 96

    by J. Bruha

    I know this is a 1/8″ shaft bit, but I would rather use it in a drill, than a high speed rotary tool. If you had a variable speed tool, and ran it slow, it would probably be fine.What this does, is repairs damaged internal threads by use of a tiny grinding wheel with a V profile to match standard thread angles. It is not for cutting new threads, but fixing threads that are damaged. It works really well with galled threads, getting out the burrs that are all but welded in the threads.Go slow, and gentle, too high an RPM and it wants to chatter, and will not result in as clean of a repair.In my opinion, it is not meant for routine thread chasing, but rather as a rescue tool to clean out threads of things too hard to cut with a tap, or for something larger than you have a tap for. The bigger the diameter of the threads, the easier it is to do a good job. I had a choice to either replace a $30 spindle nut, buy a tap that size for $40, or clean up the threads with this. I took my time, and it turned out really well, and paid for itself in one use.

  9. 96

    by Charlie Michalak

    If you have to repair threads, this is the tool you need, my only suggestion is order the larger one, also do not add pressure to the tool lay it in the damaged threads lightly run along threads,

  10. 96

    by Kathie C

    I bought this to clean up the threads on a part where the threads were distorted by welding. This tool cleaned them up nicely in a matter of minutes.I also used it to clean up the rusty threads on our main drain clean-out fitting which was pretty messed up after nearly fifty years. Fifteen minutes later the threads on the drain and cap were cleaned up and the cap securely screwed on.I would suggest when working on heavily damaged threads that you stop occasionally to flush the rust or metal particles out of the threads. And no matter what, flush them out when you are done.

  11. 96

    by ez-reader

    Just the thing for fine thread rejuvenation work but be patient, cautious, and not to get too aggressive. I needed to repair a fine set of threads on a wheel hub for an antique car and when the job was done the cap screwed on smoothly as when it was new. Thanks.

  12. 96

    by Kenny

    Bought this to give it a try and never got around to using it yet….. but I feel it’s a great product worth the money!

  13. 96

    by Patrick

    This makes quick work of fixing bent threads using a rotary tool.

  14. 96

    by john dragon

    This little Rotary file does what they say it will do, but controlling the depth of cut will take a lot of practice.

  15. 96

    by Dale Hauck

    I bought it to use in my shop in place of a thread file. It’s smaller than I expected but that’s a good thing. Has been useful and effective.

  16. 96

    by Aaron Patterson

    The result isn’t as pretty as using a tap or die to repair threads but it works surprisingly well and is much less expensive than buying costly tools you will probably never use again.

  17. 96

    by Virgil

    It fix any bad thread. Highly recommended. Easy to use.

  18. 96

    by Bruce H.

    While I didn’t use this exact thread repair item (I found one at the local auto parts store before this one got here) I filed both internal and external threads. The one I got at the auto parts store is the same as the one I ordered from Amazon. (kept both of them) These were 22mm left hand wheel studs and nuts, didn’t know this was possible. Worked like a charm!

  19. 96

    by James

    I purchased this tool after watching a review of a similar product on YouTube. This one is very similar if not the exact product. Works great with a high rpm impact drill. Also it does take a little getting use to at first, my suggestion is lock down whatever your working on and use two hands to control the direction of the drill as well as the recoil of the spinning bit. Also go with the direction of the drill while using. LIFE SAVER!!!

  20. 96

    by Skeevatz

    I have to say, I was skeptical but this tool really got me out of a bind! I was rebuilding a rearend on a car and somewhere along the line the threads by the hubs were damaged. I could not get the nut to start and it was clear to see the malformed threads. After going over the threads a few times with this bit in a Dremel, the nut went right on. Saved me a ton of rework and a trip to the machine shop – or having to purchase a massive die. The price is a no-brainer, I highly recommend.

  21. 96

    by Lake Place

    I bought this to repair the socket for the ride guides on my boat trailer. The sockets are 1.25 in pipe couplers welded to the trailer, and the threads rust over time. This tool worked great!

  22. 96

    by Arthur D. Drennen

    Mangled the threads on a one inch axle removing some components with a hydraulic press. This file took some time, but allowed me to fix the threads to point.I can thread axle nuts on by hand.

  23. 96

    by sIR sHOE

    This thing is a must have. Saved me from having to buy a 300$ tap for an M27 thread on a pair of stainless long tube headers. Cleaned up the threads well and allowed me to install the correct fitting.

  24. 96

    by bucyrus

    haven’t used the tool yet but it looks to be of good quality and able to do the job it is designed for

  25. 96

    by jemmett

    We used the tool on an inside thread, that we did not have a tap for. Follow the instructions and you should not have a problem using this tool!

  26. 96

    by MV

    It looks great, but it was too large for the job I had at the time. I’m sure I’ll find a use for it at some point.

  27. 96

    by Daljit S.

    Works very well

  28. 96

    by Jim Rooth

    Does a quick and efficient job.

  29. 96

    by Rotomech

    Used just yesterday after receiving it a couple weeks ago. Saved the threads on a unreplaceable track pad. Must have tool for your rethreading kit.

  30. 96

    by Elizabeth Piper

    Perfect. Came in time and what we needed. Thank you

  31. 96

    by Gus Hillenbrand

    Great

  32. 96

    by skip welsh

    As advertised!

  33. 96

    by Maria E. Shipman

    great

  34. 96

    by Spark Carlander

    difficult to use on internal threads due to seeing what one is doing.

  35. 96

    by K. Swanson

    Loved this tool. I needed to fix the threads on an outdoor faucet and could find nothing except an expensive custom die or even more expensive universal thread restorer. It took less than five minutes from the time I started until I had the hose screwing on smoothly. Definitely stays in my toolbox!

  36. 96

    by Ernest R. Martinez

    Worked like a charm, as advertised!

  37. 96

    by Alan Teskey

    Cuts fast use with care. Quick

  38. 96

    by Joe S.

    I’m not sure this product really “repaired” the threads. I had some threads on an M12x1.0 that were smashed in a small area that made it difficult to thread a nut. This tool is just a grinder and you need to be cautious about grinding too much. While it worked in that I could thread the nut on it was mostly due to the fact that this basically removed the threads in the spot entirely. If you aren’t careful you could potentially cross cut the threads.I think this may work better on larger thread pitches like 1.25+ but on fine threads like 1.0 its more difficult.The product “worked” but for the money a die or chaser still works better.

  39. 96

    by jim marsicano

    easy to use just take your time

  40. 96

    by Stephen M. Meyer

    Hard to control staying in the groove of the damaged thread

  41. 96

    by Maria

    Ruined the threads on a crankshaft and this fixed them

  42. 96

    by eduardo

    Not easy to use…maybe for bigger thread would work ..but the wheel axle thread it didnt

  43. 96

    by Joe Ureel

    Works great! Was really easy to use in my dremel.

  44. 96

    by Kindle Customer

    easy 2 use, intuitive, good pice

  45. 96

    by Amazon Customer

    Rethreading a pvc pipe & Plug.

  46. 96

    by Dayami

    Excelente , tal y como se ve en la foto ,totalmente nuevo y s??per ??til , lo recomiendo .

  47. 96

    by James

    Easier to use than chasing threads with a file to get rid of paint and nicks on threads

  48. 96

    by John Sommers

    This Rotary File worked just like I hoped it would. I just occasionally have threads to fileso it should last me a long time. I recommend this file.

  49. 96

    by FXE

    Chasing fine threads with a dremel tool requires a steady hand or you will ruin the part.V cutter is hard to hold steady and will jump around. Tool works ok but you will need a v file to completeThe job

  50. 96

    by averageguy7

    After watching the short video I was confident the rotary tool would fix any damaged threads. I was mistaken. I purchased the rotary tool to hopefully restore some rocker arm stud threads that were damaged. Sadly it did not work at all. Maybe the threads were too far gone for repair. Luckily I was able to replace the studs with new ones.

  51. 96

    by Malcolm A Staudinger

    Repaired very fine threads on an expensive engine part with ease. It was a size I would never have used again if I even wanted to spend the $150+ on a die in that size

  52. 96

    by Robert Crissinger

    Great tool to clean up buggered threads

  53. 96

    by Vincent Van

    It is over priced and doesn’t work well as advertised

  54. 96

    by df

    Saved me a lot of money and time. Works great.

  55. 96

    by Amazon Customer

    It worked! Saved me lots of money. Definitely worth a try.

  56. 96

    by CASH A BAILEY

    It works really well! I just needed to practice a bit. Recommend buying both sizes. Do keep in in a safe place. My smaller one got a little bent. My own fault really.

  57. 96

    by Amazon Customer

    worked well to clean up mashed threads

  58. 96

    by Kong Moua

    This thing was actually very helpful.

  59. 96

    by DW

    Good for cleaning damaged threads!

  60. 96

    by Amazon Customer

    This worked great bad thread on ring and pinon

  61. 96

    by Kathy

    this file worked amazingly well on a decades old floor drain that was rusted.. I recommend it to anyone with any thread problems..

  62. 96

    by Tain

    Have an old fire hydrant bad threads this works.

  63. 96

    by BrdHntr

    This thing works well. I’m a machinist and everyone brings thier screwed up threads to me to repair. This has saved the day especially on internal threads many times.

  64. 96

    by Brenda Frankhouser

    Nice price and works well

  65. 96

    by jenifer llamas

    Works great

  66. 96

    by CASH A BAILEY

    Got me out of a few binds. Get both sizes.

  67. 96

    by Andy

    I messed up a couple threads on a stainless steel prop shaft, this little tool saved me $1300.

  68. 96

    by Amazon Customer

    No ones hands are steady enough to use this tool. Would work on big threads only. would of sent it back but discarded package

  69. 96

    by Brenda Frankhouser

    Nice price and works great

  70. 96

    by Cody

    Worked great repairing threads

  71. 96

    by Dr. David J. Liu

    Doesn’t work at all. It keeps bumping around and doesn’t fix the thread

  72. 96

    by Donald Lawson

    Didn’t have any luck on 3/4 inch threads, went ahead and bought tap to clean threads.

  73. 96

    by Alfred Rodriguez

    don’t work as promoted

  74. 96

    by Glenn Lord

    I had a 1 inch shaft on my disk plow that the threads had been boogered by a loose nut and heavy shims. This tool straighten them out in ten minutes.

  75. 96

    by Spark Carlander

    Need a steady hand like a dentist to use the tool without doing damage, especially in a soft material like aluminum alloy.

  76. 96

    by Michael D Willard

    Arrived on time and was the right tool I needed

  77. 96

    by Ford 850

    I used this to chase a 20 pitch thread on a mill quill. It worked great and was easy to use. It saved me from buying a several hundred dollar replacement quill. Worth every penny.

  78. 96

    by Robert Blankenship

    Repaired stud threads on my truck.

  79. 96

    by Rob V.

    Used to restore threads on some coilover bodies. Worked great. Much better than buying a large expensive thread chaser if all you have are a couple damaged threads.For external threads, a thread restorer file may work a bit better/faster. But internal threads is where this product shines.Saved me a bunch of money, thanks.

  80. 96

    by Maria E. Shipman

    great

  81. 96

    by Patrick

    This makes quick work of fixing bent threads using a rotary tool.

  82. 96

    by MV

    It looks great, but it was too large for the job I had at the time. I’m sure I’ll find a use for it at some point.

  83. 96

    by skip welsh

    As advertised!

  84. 96

    by Ernest R. Martinez

    Worked like a charm, as advertised!

  85. 96

    by Marvin

    Keys to success with this little gem of a tool.FIrst of all, I am not at paid representative of this tool! I love tools that perform as advertised! And I love quality tools. This tool saved me hundreds of dollars and countless hours of work. My outboard motor thermostat housing is a 1-1/2″ aluminum threaded bore and has a “composite” cover. The threads are 16 TPI (threads per inch) when I went to unscrew the “composite” cover to gain access to the thermostat the whole threaded piece snapped away leaving all the threaded piece inside the housing bore! So I had to chip away the threaded section of the cover (plastic) from the aluminum housing with a diamond point chisel (another gem of a tool.) While I was very careful not to damage the aluminum threads while breaking the plastic threads out I managed to nick a couple of places but not too bad. I looked for a 16 TPI internal thread file online and boy are they expensive. And they are limited in reach on an internal thread. I had never heard of this Rotary Thread File tool before. Being a retired machinist/millwright I often could of used this tool many times. Anyway I came upon the Rotary thread file site. And ordered the 754, 4″ long little gem. I already had my comp. hose and 30,00 RPM die grinder ready before the tool arrived 3 days later, but thought this was overkill, and if the threads weren’t perfect I would ruin my new composite cover threads? This wasn’t a 30,000 RPM moment. So, I placed this magic tool it into the not easily accessible threaded bore and slowly began moving it into the damaged area and spun it with my right hand fingertips while supporting it with my left hand I could feel it cutting. I used it dry with no cutting fluids so I could blow the shavings and deeply embedded corrosion out from the bore. (thank you saltwater) After about 10 minutes I was able to hand thread my new composite cover in with two fingers. I Assembled the thermostat housing with new gaskets and “O” ring, test ran engine with no leaks. What a cool little tool, I used it on all the threads to clean the deeply imbedded corrosion in the bottom of the threads. All by hand. It is also a good thread chaser and cleaner. This is an ingenious tool! All threads are the same angle, (60 degrees) fine, (SAE) coarse, National, Metric, Pipe, etc., this little tool is the perfect angle of the thread, thats why it works! It even works on any different amounts of thread per inch, (Pitch) because they are still 60 degrees. It isn’t designed for acme threads (Drilling rig and valve stems) and other mophodite or speciality threads. But at your request I believe you can special order the correct one for those. So it will work on any normal thread, especially on all the threads my retired a#* will come across. This will be a hot item in everyone’s toolbox. Don’t bother to, watch the YouTubers demonstrating this tool. (They were traveling the wrong way, attacked bad threads from the top) etc. etc. (it does make for a “How Not to Grind Threads With a Rotary Tool” video). You’ll want to reach through the screen and grab it from their hands and show them the right way to use this tool, with finesse and much better results. After watching these guys work and mangle some already mangled threads (I wouldn’t let them check the air in my tires!) But guess what when they finished with their “hope for the best moment”, they were successful, it wasn’t pretty but it does show that you don’t need any special skills to have success with this little tool! I never used this tool in a Rotary tool such as a die grinder. (Ididn’t need too!) But I have used all types of grinders including high speed air grinders many, many, times over the period of a 42 year career of Pipe fitter/welder and Machinist/Millwright. From that experience I think I can Suggest 5 Key tips to help you use this tool with confidence for the squemish or nervous type working with power tools. (1) As with all rotating tools and grinders they need to be used in a certain rotational direction in relation to your direction of travel to avoid kick-back. So attack the bad thread area from “under” the front part of thread with the bottom of stone rotating up toward that area. You should learn the rotation of the tool you are using before starting. For this example let’s figure Clockwise and counterclockwise is with the tool in your hand looking from the rear of the tool to the disc or stone. Cut with the tool traveling to the left if your tool rotates clockwise. Cut with the tool traveling to the right if your tool rotates counterclockwise. This keeps the tool from climbing up from the bottom of the threads and skimming on the top of the thread uncontrollably. (2) Prop your tool hand. Find a way to support your tool to give you better control. Use both hands. (3) Make a dry run with the tool disconnected from power. This will give you the feel of proper placement of the tool, especially if you are repairing fine threads. 4) Hold the tool perpendicular to the threads at all times. If you have to stop to reposition, than do so, but get another spot to prop. Remember you can’t travel very far without loosing your 90 degree perpendicular hold. (5) Finally don’t work your stone. Let the stone do the work. Move the stone very slowly with very very light pressure and try to approach the bad thread with the rotating stone at the bottom of the groove. You may not be able to attack it from the top of the thread and maintain control. You’ll have better control if you use the bottom of the groove as a guide working into the damaged area, don’t rush and don’t try to make the repair in one pass. There is a certain amount of finesse needed here! Taking your time yields better results. If you use these steps you could probably use it by feel alone if it gets hard to see at times. If this happens slow down and let the tool tell you if your “in the groove”. Good Luck!Hopefully these steps dont scare you. These tools are simple to use! Granny could use them. These steps are to make you and some of the “YouTubers” more informed with basic rotating rools use and to teach you to think every job out ahead of time. Sorry I know these steps were similar to a safety meeting and meant for someone with little to no experience. But if they helped you, your welcome. If you already knew these steps your welcome too. It doesn’t hurt to refresh!! LOL . Good Luck! & Work safe!

  86. 96

    by Robert Blankenship

    Repaired stud threads on my truck.

  87. 96

    by FXE

    Chasing fine threads with a dremel tool requires a steady hand or you will ruin the part.V cutter is hard to hold steady and will jump around. Tool works ok but you will need a v file to completeThe job

  88. 96

    by BrdHntr

    This thing works well. I’m a machinist and everyone brings thier screwed up threads to me to repair. This has saved the day especially on internal threads many times.

  89. 96

    by Skeevatz

    I have to say, I was skeptical but this tool really got me out of a bind! I was rebuilding a rearend on a car and somewhere along the line the threads by the hubs were damaged. I could not get the nut to start and it was clear to see the malformed threads. After going over the threads a few times with this bit in a Dremel, the nut went right on. Saved me a ton of rework and a trip to the machine shop – or having to purchase a massive die. The price is a no-brainer, I highly recommend.

  90. 96

    by T. R. Stedman

    Concept of tool really good when used in good hands however the shank of tool is too short, it would only reach part way into threaded bore in my case and chuck of rotating tool got in the way. It will be a usefull addition to my rethreading repertoire but next job not this one.

  91. 96

    by Glenn Lord

    I had a 1 inch shaft on my disk plow that the threads had been boogered by a loose nut and heavy shims. This tool straighten them out in ten minutes.

  92. 96

    by William Edwards

    It’s very rare these days that things actually work, and this thing worked. Saved me $985!. We have a firetruck and one of the hose reels threads had corroded to the point of no return. The replacement cost was extremely expensive as the thread is attached to one piece and can not be replaced. I gave this thing a try as a hail-mary and it actually worked. Half of the threads were on the backside that I couldn’t see so I just followed the front threads and prayed that i wouldn’t jump over a thread. Followed it all the way back around and kept going. Used a little Brakleen to clean off the grit and the coupler fit right on first time around. I still cant believe it.

  93. 96

    by John Sommers

    This Rotary File worked just like I hoped it would. I just occasionally have threads to fileso it should last me a long time. I recommend this file.

  94. 96

    by Kong Moua

    This thing was actually very helpful.

  95. 96

    by Lake Place

    I bought this to repair the socket for the ride guides on my boat trailer. The sockets are 1.25 in pipe couplers welded to the trailer, and the threads rust over time. This tool worked great!

  96. 96

    by Robert Crissinger

    Great tool to clean up buggered threads

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